The House of Power (Atherton #1) by Patrick Carman

The House of Power by Patrick Carman

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Release: 2007
Image Source: Junior Library Guild
Other Titles in Series: The Rivers of Fire, The Dark Planet

Rating:
Characters- 17/20
Plot- 19/20
Writing- 18/20
Originality- 20/20
Recommendation- 20/20
Overall- 94/100 or A-

Synopsis: Dr. Harding is the futuristic mad scientist responsible for creating Atherton: a three tiered satellite world orbiting the fallen Earth. But those who live on Atherton don’t know Earth exists or their role in trying to save it. Edgar, a gifted climber, is one of the first to discover the first of many startling revelations to come: the three tiered world of Atherton is collapsing. A dangerous world of strange creatures and hidden powers with a history locked inside the mad scientist, Atherton is much more than it appears at first glance. 

Review: The House of Power is the first installment of the Atherton trilogy; written and imagineered by Patrick Carman. This first installment details the many dangerous and revolutionary events on the mysterious land of Atherton. The plot itself is fairly simple and decent, being a fantasy written with an adolescent audience in mind. A likable protagonist named of Edgar is presented whose various endeavors and exploits the story revolves around.

The fabric of The House of Power is rich and textured, and coupled with a breeze-to-read writing style, it should greatly appeal to younger readers. Upon starting the first chapter, I was pleasantly enthralled by a gentle mystery. The ingenious Dr. Harding is portrayed as a mad scientist, which subsequently offered a glimpse into his experiment gone wrong—Atherton itself. Indeed, the world Carman imagined is both beautiful and tragic, a success and a disaster.

The satellite world of Atherton was constructed in the 22nd century, following the environmental collapse of Earth. Overbearing pollution and technological dominance ravaged Earth for many years, until it became known as simply The Dark Planet. The original plan of Atherton was to be a refuge from The Dark Planet, but its prime creator, Dr. Harding, held secret intentions. He held specific notions how a new utopia should be created. The Doctor even developed strict guidelines on how the biological and socio-political environments should be structured. In turn, Atherton was constructed based on a three-tier layout. The top level, called the Highlands, was the location of the only water source in Atherton, and the ruling class of citizens. Next is Tabletop, the middle tier and home of the lower class. In Tabletop, the residents farm sheep, rabbits, and a certain hybrid of figs. Most of these resources sent to the Highlands. The third and final level is called the Flatlands. This dark and barren place is filled with mystery and intrigue. No one from the top two levels has ever been to the Flatlands, and any past records are nonexistent.

As you can see, a dynamic power-play is evident between the two classes of residents on Atherton. The Highlanders control the only water source, and in turn take advantage of the power to invoke harsh demands on the lower class. Tabletop struggles to cater to their lords and must contend with living in near-poverty and intensive labor. Later in the novel, readers should recognize the stirrings of discontent and rebellion as the two classes fall closer together than anyone could imagine. The mystery of Atherton is finally revealed, and mind-blowing is truly the only way to describe the surprises sure to come.

The House of Power is a quick, entertaining read sure to win the hearts of any audience. Adolescents and tweens will especially enjoy the high level of excitement and action within its pages. I tip my hat to Patrick Carman, who is a master at building enjoyable fantasies.

Overall Grade: A- 
Atherton: The House of Power is a most interesting exploration of an alternative world—and the social relationships between its inhabitants. Despite Edgar’s admirability, the characters of the book were lacking on a few fronts. Fortunately, the unique environment and well-rounded plot are plenty enough satisfy most readers.
Carman, Patrick. (2007) The House of Power. United States: Little, Brown and Company
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